" Thoughts regarding Music" " …music prompts the philosopher's continued fascination because it is by nature so nearby the fundamentals of human existence" (Pieper 39). In the section, " Thoughts about Music, " coming from Josef Pieper's Only the Mate Sings: Artwork and Contemplation, discusses music and the interesting question, " What do we perceive when we listen to music? " (40).

Pieper answers this problem by citing Schopenhauer, who have claimed music, " does not speak of points but tells of weal and woe" (42). This makes sense because it pertains to " man's good, " and the yearning for perfect happiness. When listening to music certain emotions surface, as Avenirse stated, " Music copies the impulses of the soul" (Pieper 45). Thus, to truly understand what all of us perceive when we listen to music, one need to understand what is being expressed, and not " pay attention. " For a lot of, music is definitely an " out of body experience, " something that truly reveal's person and his meaning in life. A few may believe music is actually " …a means of personal enchantment, of escapism…" (Pieper 50). Just how one views and interprets music truly reveals your character, mainly because, " music lays uncovered man's internal existential state, " (Pieper 50).

In addition , Pieper continue to be answer the question of that which we perceive once we listen to music, by citing other philosophers and the concepts of Western philosophical traditions. " To repeat: therefore has the characteristics of music variously recently been understood in the Western philosophical tradition- because non-verbal articulation of weal and woe; as wordless expression of man's intrinsic dynamism of self-realization, a procedure understood while man's trip toward honest personhood, since the manifestation of man's will in all aspects, as love. This, as an example, is the that means of Plato's statement that 'music imitates the impulses of the soul', or as Aristotle puts it: music is similar to ethics and related to that. The same tradition continues in remarks by simply Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche when...